Desired policy positions for the next leader of the Conservative Party

We asked our supporters what their desired policy positions are for the next leader of the Conservative Party. We received a total of 1,128 responses and 648 of the responses were from respondents who declared that they were members of the Conservative Party. The survey was carried out between 26th May - June 3rd.


The results highlighted a few key things. There was, perhaps surprisingly, muted enthusiasm for tax cuts with investing in public services and balancing the budget both ranking higher in members priorities.


Furthermore, respondents felt very strongly that more needs to be done in order to ensure that big corporations pay a fair amount of tax. This was very closely followed by a desire for stricter immigration controls and additional defence spending.


Of the responses from Conservative Party members, the results were as follows (ranked in order of the percentage of members agreeing that the next leader should support it):


  • 89% supported a tougher stance on ensuring big businesses pay a fair amount of tax and play by the rules

  • 88% of respondents felt that the next leader of the Party should introduce stricter immigration controls

  • 87% supported additional defence spending

  • 78.6% supported the continuation of subsidies for British farmers after Brexit

  • 77% supported a no-deal Brexit over a managed withdrawal via the Withdrawal Agreement

  • 69.7% supported NHS reform to improve efficiency whilst 29% wanted to see additional funding for the NHS

  • Meanwhile, there was strong opposition to building on the Greenbelt with 69.2% disagreeing with building on the greenbelt in order to build more homes. Only 21.6% agreed with building on the greenbelt whilst the remainder didn't know.

  • Only 27.6% of respondents supported the abolition of tuition fees

  • Perhaps most surprisingly, only 24.7% supported the repeal of the fox hunting ban with 53.3% opposing the repeal of the ban and the remainder responding that they didn't know.